IBEC SESSION 1: DEVELOPMENTS IN BENEFITS, EVALUATION AND COSTS OF ROAD CHARGING

TUESDAY 11 OCTOBER, 1400 – 1530 HOURS

MEETING ROOM – 203 HOURS MEETING ROOM 204

Organiser

  • Steve Morello, D’Artagnan, United States

Moderator

  • Steve Morello, D’Artagnan, United States

Speakers

  • Andrew Hyles, DIIRD, Australia
  • Steven Newman, EROAD, New Zealand
  • Malcolm Dougherty, Caltrans, United States

Around the world, states, provinces and countries are examining and evaluating potential policy initiatives to change the way they pay for their transportation infrastructure to mitigate the decline in fuel tax revenues. Road charging is a funding mechanism where drivers pay to maintain roads based on the miles they drive, rather than the amount of fuel their vehicles consume. It sends the right price signals to drivers and directly helps them to first think about their trip and its cost impacts on themselves and others. Road charging recognizes that a city, a state, or indeed a country’s road network, is more than a series of individual roads. It is a complex network, where congestion problems (and mobility solutions) are always interlinked. Several recent and planned pilot projects provide participants a variety of manual and technological choices for reporting the miles they travel, as well as a choice for submitting real or simulated payments. This session will comprise speakers who are addressing declining revenues from fuel taxes – major issue states/provinces/countries are wrestling with – by promoting road charging as a utility based approach to paying for road usage.

 

IBEC SESSION 2: POTENTIAL BENEFITS OF MOBILITY AS A SERVICE AND WHAT IS ALREADY PROVEN?

TUESDAY 11 OCTOBER 2016, 1600 – 1730 HOURS

MEETING ROOM 204

Organiser

  • Martin Bohm, AustriaTech, Austria

Moderator

  • TBA

Speakers

  • Martin Bohm, AustriaTech, Austria
  • Sampo Hietanen, MaaS Finland, Finland
  • Alexa Delbosc, Monash University, Australia
  • Jana Socher, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden
  • Tim Papandreou, SFMTA, United States

In the last couple of years several initiatives on “Mobility as a Service” (MaaS) have been undertaken around the globe. Within the MaaS concept transport services from public and private providers are promoted together as mobility packages for travellers. In this concept no one single mode (e.g. car usage) is the driver for mobility; rather mobility is the driver for single modes (e.g. having a mobility security to come from A to B). This concept would be based on a systematic change through a changed travel behaviour of people – from ownership of a vehicle towards ownership of mobility services. The first results from MaaS demonstrations and pilots are now available and will be discussed in this IBEC session.

Questions will be posed such as: Are travellers willing to rely on mobility services instead of car ownership? What does a benefit-cost ratio look like for the single stakeholders – including travellers? Will sharing services promoted via MaaS led to a reduced need for public transport as well as for individual car ownership? Are there different expectations from travellers across the globe?

 

IBEC SESSION 3: EVALUATION OF CONNECTED AND INCREASINGLY AUTOMATED VEHICLES

THURSDAY 13 OCTOBER 2016, 1400 – 1530 HOURS

MEETING ROOM 203

Organiser

  • Alan Stevens, TRL, United Kingdom

Moderator

  • Andrew Somers, Australia

Speakers

  • Alan Stevens, TRL, United Kingdom
  • Miranda Blogg, Department of Transport and Main
  • Roads, Australia
  • James Sayer, University of Michigan Transportation
  • Research Institute, United States
  • Satu Innamaa, VTT, Finland

Evaluating the impact of connected vehicles (cooperative ITS) presents unique challenges beyond the already complex world of ITS evaluation. Factors include additional stakeholders, multiple communication technologies and the possibility of implementing services in many different ways. As connected vehicles become increasingly automated the situation changes in ways that may be difficult to predict. Currently, there is a dearth of experimental data but “ex-ante” assessments to help determine investment priorities have been based on relevant data from elsewhere, hypotheses about impacts, and estimates from “expert judgement”. Such systems promise to: (i) improve traffic safety by reducing driver workload and minimizing human errors due to driver distraction or reduced vigilance; (ii) increase mobility through reduction of congestion (iii) reduce vehicle emissions and fuel consumption; and (iv) provide individual, organizational and commercial productivity improvements. But, to what extent are these benefits likely to be realized? How will drivers actually behave and react? What new metrics and performance measures do we need to consider in deployment? Limited trials and pilots are now underway but we know that data will often be confounded. The session will explore, through examples and case studies, the challenge of evaluating the potential benefits of connected vehicles.

 

IBEC SESSION 4: EFFECTS OF AUTOMATED DRIVING TO REDUCE ACCIDENTS AND FATALITIES – THE COST/BENEFIT PERSPECTIVE

THURSDAY 13 OCTOBER 2016, 1600 – 1730 HOURS

MEETING ROOM 203

Organiser

  • Reinhard Pfliegl, Reinhard Pfliegl, A3PS, Austria

Moderator

  • Reinhard Pfliegl, Reinhard Pfliegl, A3PS, Austria

Speakers

  • Alan Stevens, United Kingdom
  • Glenn Geers, ARRB Group, Australia
  • Marcia Pincus, US DOT, United States

Worldwide, the economic cost of road accidents and fatalities burdens the national budget (public economy cost) by billions of USD every year. In 2010 UN and IRF introduced a Decade of Action initiative with the ambition to half the number by 2025. One aspect with the potential to dramatically reduce fatalities, accidents and increase efficiency is implementation of automated driving (SAE Level 5). Highly or fully automated cars and trucks require a new approach for evaluating benefits and costs, particularly for SAE Level 5 vehicles (full autonomous in all conditions without any driver). Level 5 vehicles promise to:

(i) improve traffic safety

(ii) increase mobility through reduction of congestion

(iii) reduce vehicle emissions and fuel consumption and

(iv) provide individual, organizational and commercial productivity improvements.

But to what extent are these benefits likely to be realized and when?